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Weekly QUEST Discussion Topics and News, Feb 1st

January 31, 2013 Leave a comment

QUEST Discussion Topics and News Feb 1st

We are excited to have Dr. Kirk Weigand lead this week’s QUEST discussion. Attached here is a short description of the material he plans to present, if you would like a copy of his slides please contact Cathy Griffith.

“Modeling and Measuring Complexity”
Abstract: We wish we could just unplug from the myriad of emails and
meetings so we can just focus, but the complexity of what we are researching requires us to pay attention to all that “noise” in hope of finding those few, faint but valuable “signals.” The culprit here is complexity but what is complexity? Some would turn to computational complexity measures, such as P or NP, to describe the combinatorial complications of searching or calculating over a very large problem space. Contrary to this view of complexity in the world; John Warfield, Aleco Christakis and other systems thinkers believe problems are of the mind(s) and not of the world. Therefore, complex problems are to be measured through scientific observations of those who share those perceptions. Warfield/Christakis Situational Complexity Index (SCI) offers a systematic means, albeit expensive, for measuring complexity. AFRL/RYW conducted strategic planning workshops in the summer of 2011 and produced SCI scores that can be compared to other kinds of complex projects. This talk will discuss SCI, the Structured Dialogic Design methodology by which SCI is calculated and the findings of last summer’s workshops. I will argue that by occasionally and collaboratively plugging in more deeply, we can gauge our involvement with complexity and engage with it more consciously and constructively.

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QUEST Discussion Topics, Jan 25th

January 24, 2013 Leave a comment

We are excited to have Dr. Kirk Weigand lead this week’s QUEST discussion. Attached here is a short description of the material he plans to present, if you would like a copy of his slides please contact Cathy Griffith.

“Modeling and Measuring Complexity”
Abstract: We wish we could just unplug from the myriad of emails and
meetings so we can just focus, but the complexity of what we are researching requires us to pay attention to all that “noise” in hope of finding those few, faint but valuable “signals.” The culprit here is complexity but what is complexity? Some would turn to computational complexity measures, such as P or NP, to describe the combinatorial complications of searching or calculating over a very large problem space. Contrary to this view of complexity in the world; John Warfield, Aleco Christakis and other systems thinkers believe problems are of the mind(s) and not of the world. Therefore, complex problems are to be measured through scientific observations of those who share those perceptions. Warfield/Christakis Situational Complexity Index (SCI) offers a systematic means, albeit expensive, for measuring complexity. AFRL/RYW conducted strategic planning workshops in the summer of 2011 and produced SCI scores that can be compared to other kinds of complex projects. This talk will discuss SCI, the Structured Dialogic Design methodology by which SCI is calculated and the findings of last summer’s workshops. I will argue that by occasionally and collaboratively plugging in more deeply, we can gauge our involvement with complexity and engage with it more consciously and constructively.

Weekly QUEST Discussion Topics and News, Jan 18th

January 17, 2013 Leave a comment

This week we are excited to have Dr. Robert Patterson lead the discussion. Please see below for a brief summary of the material.

“Human decision making involves two component processes: analytical reasoning, which entails conscious deliberative judgments (system 2), and intuitive decision making, which entails implicit situational pattern recognition (system 1). Recently, in an effort funded by AFOSR that involves stochastic modeling, we have shown that these two component processes likely form a parallel-channel co-activated system. Our research has also suggested that these two component processes may interact via attentional switching: when confronted with a simultaneous dual task, attention seems to switch between the two component processes in a way that weights the processing according to the saliency of the task demands.”

QUEST Discussion Topics and News Jan 18th

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QUEST Discussion Topics and News, Jan 11th

January 10, 2013 Leave a comment

QUEST Discussion Topics and News Jan 11th

The first meeting of the new year we always reserve for the ‘state of quest’ talk – it is meant to take anyone from no knowledge of what we are doing to a common baseline understanding of our positions –below is my working outline – your job is to help organize these thoughts – possibly a different order – and/or insert where you think there were ideas we’ve discussed or we need to discuss that would help in the overview –

When we are done we want to have a 1 hour overview talk – basically something any of us can use to tell anybody our story

• There exists a set of problems that we can’t automate to date – example death TV, medicine, ishm, cyber warfare, commercial applications, Cognitive EW – in all we use people – not sustainable
– No magic bullet will solve
• Joint cognitive is the approach we suggest –
– Define cognition –
– Joint cognitive requires wingman – for engendering trust
– Wingman solutions require not just DDAI – they require some form of artificial consciousness
– ?are there reasons for consciousness that makes us believe an artificially conscious solution will be able to solve?
• Fundamental laws / tenets – for consciousness
– Experiments to tease out
– Common Framework
– Blending – consciousness – awareness, reduce unexpected query
• Architectures to implement – alternatives / requirements
– Implementation of laws for these respective architectures
• Google approaching Consciousness- redefining the singularity
• ? conclusions? – possibly end with a list of your respective current focus