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Archive for July, 2011

QUEST DIscussion Topics and News, July 29

QUEST Discussion Topics and News 7-29

1.) Topic one is a revisit to the discussion on the efficacy of intuitive (sys1 = Libet)) and analytical (sys2 = qualia) cognition specifically adopting the idea of the continuum versus a dichotomy between their use and using the idea that task properties are inducing cognitive properties (Hammond, Hamm, Grassia, Pearson ’87).
2.) Topic two is an open brainstorming session on the open source layered sensing simulation model and its potential use as the sys2 cognition engine for a quest agent.

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Categories: Uncategorized

QUEST Discussion Topics and News, July 22

Discussion Topics and News, 7/22

1.) The first topic is associated with the article by Bob Patterson – Part of the solution to designing interfaces for decision making is to consider the dual-process theory of human decision making and reasoning (e.g., Evans, 1984, 2003, 2008; Hammond, 2007; Hogarth, 2001, 2002; Kahneman & Frederick, 2002; Sloman, 1996, 2002; Stanovich & West, 2000, 2002). This theory posits that there exist two sets of processes or systems involved in human decision making: analytical decision making (also called deliberative) versus intuitive decision making (also called pattern-recognition based), as will be discussed later. Importantly, we argue in the present paper that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for immersive environments because the intuitive process is driven by high-level perception (e.g., meaningful interpretation of sensory input via analogical reasoning – ** reasoning by analogy ** ; Hofstadter, 2001) and thus has the potential to be ideally engaged within an immersive environment. Moreover, we also argue that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for generating robust decisions because the intuitive process possesses characteristics that are analogous to robustness. One aspect of the article we want to focus on today is the analytical and intuitive systems are thought to be engaged in parallel fashion, and they functionally interact when an individual attempts to reason about a particular problem. The relative weight given to processing in one or the other system depends on the particular task at hand.
2.) Reality Mining – two articles – one on Nexus 7 a system that is attempting to respond to the Gen Flynn challenge – Nexus 7 culls the vast U.S. spy apparatus to figure out which communities in Afghanistan are falling apart and which are stabilizing; which are loyal to the government in Kabul and which are falling under the influence of the militants. Also an article from the technical father of the effort Sandy Pentland – ‘To signal is human’ – that discusses the area of capturing and understanding ‘honest signals’ – what we would call sys1 signals and the critical information in those signals.

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Link to download site for Patterson paper

Categories: News Stories

QUEST Penta chart

Categories: Uncategorized

Weekly Discussion Topics, July 15th

Weekly QUEST Discussion topics July 15

Weekly QUEST Discussion topics
July 15, 2011

1.) The highest thing on my list this week is a revision of our summary talk on QUEST. I am giving the Keynote address for an Integrated Systems Health management Conference in Boston and this provides an opportunity for us to rethink our story and how to communicate it to others. So topic one for this week is an outline of our overview so come to the meeting with ideas you think are key to emphasize. We also have the ear of the group within Sensors Directorate with the group doing the next generation of the LSOC. I hope to get the opportunity to present the idea to this group on the use of a virtual world environment as an implementation of Sys2.
2.) Topic two is ‘Gut Feelings’ – Second of several installments on talks on the book by gerd gigerenzer – Viking Press 2007 – that has interesting information on Sys1 calculations – Defining gut (intuition or hunch or in our terms Sys1 = Libet) feelings: Appears quickly in consciousness (we would say the results of the calculation gets posted to consciousness) – Whose underlying reasons we are not fully aware of – Is strong enough to act upon, rules of thumb / heuristics, conclusions include Even when more information is free – situations exist where more information is detrimental – more information, more time, more insider knowledge can result in poorer decision quality, interesting quote by Whitehead ‘civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them’,
3.) An article provided by Prof Mills – ‘The Dynamic OODA Loop: Amalgamating Boyd’s OODA Loop and the Cybernetic Approach to Command and Control’.
http://www.dodccrp.org/events/10th_ICCRTS/CD/papers/365.pdf
DOODA is a model for C2. Falls into our ‘Beyond the OODA nonsense’ think piece. The DOODA loop is formulated in terms of functions that must be accomplished for effective C2, and these functions are then studied in terms of (partially overlapping) processes. The DOODA loop preserves the prescriptive richness of the cybernetic approach in that it represents all the sources of delay in the C2 process envisioned by that approach, and thus escapes the limited focus on speed of decision making characteristic of discussions of C2 based on the OODA loop.
4.) News article on contextual memory –
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/05/health/05memory.html?ref=health
For the first time, scientists have recorded traces in the brain of that kind of contextual memory, the ever-shifting kaleidoscope of thoughts and emotions that surrounds every piece of newly learned information. The recordings, taken from the brains of people awaiting surgery for epilepsy, suggest that new memories of even abstract facts — an Italian verb, for example — are encoded in a brain-cell firing sequence that also contains information about what else was happening during and just before the memory was formed, whether a tropical daydream or frustration with the Mets.
5.) Light field photography could be the biggest innovation to hit photography in many years – Lytro web site has some great examples.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/22/technology/22camera.html?_r=1
http://www.lytro.com/picture_gallery
6.) Memrise learning method –
http://www.technologyreview.com/printer_friendly_article.aspx?id=37874
The Memrise learning method is based on three principles. The first, Cooke says, is one of the most important aspects of memory training: vivid encoding. In order to recall otherwise arbitrary words, the user’s brain benefits from connecting them to an image. The more associations to a word the user makes, the quicker and clearer the recall. Memrise provides some associations for users—the Chinese character for “man,” for example, transforms into a cartoon drawing of a man. But it also encourages users to submit their own verbal mnemonics —- second principle of Memrise’s approach is to remind users systematically. Using an algorithm developed by neuroscientist and cofounder Greg Detre, the app is designed so “plants,” or words, wilt when not tended to. The user interface tells users which plants are wilting, a problem they can remedy by “watering,” or repeated testing. Reminders pop up when a user is most likely to forget new words, rather than at random intervals.—- final Memrise principle is adaptive testing, which means that questions vary in difficulty according to the user’s performance. “Other language sites get this wrong,” says Cooke. “It’s really important that you test these memories at the right time and in the right way.”
7.) The last topic is associated with the article by Bob Patterson – Part of the solution to designing interfaces for decision making is to consider the dual-process theory of human decision making and reasoning (e.g., Evans, 1984, 2003, 2008; Hammond, 2007; Hogarth, 2001, 2002; Kahneman & Frederick, 2002; Sloman, 1996, 2002; Stanovich & West, 2000, 2002).
http://edm.sagepub.com/content/3/4/331.abstract

This theory posits that there exist two sets of processes or systems involved in human decision making: analytical decision making (also called deliberative) versus intuitive decision making (also called pattern-recognition based), as will be discussed later. Importantly, we argue in the present paper that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for immersive environments because the intuitive process is driven by high-level perception (e.g., meaningful interpretation of sensory input via analogical reasoning – ** reasoning by analogy ** ; Hofstadter, 2001) and thus has the potential to be ideally engaged within an immersive environment. Moreover, we also argue that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for generating robust decisions because the intuitive process possesses characteristics that are analogous to robustness. Thus, we argue that immersive decision environments should be designed with the idea of training intuitive decision making.

Article from Dr. Wunsch II about detecting subtle face expressions

Categories: General Tech, News Stories

QUEST Discussion Topics, July 8 2011

QUEST Discussion Topics
July 8, 2011

1.) The highest thing on my list this week is a revision of our summary talk on QUEST. On Monday I will be giving the overview talk to an AFIT class and then in a week after that I am giving the Keynote address for an Integrated Systems Health management Conference in Boston and these provide an opportunity for us to rethink our story and how to communicate it to others. So topic one for this week is an outline of our overview so come to the meeting with ideas you think are key to emphasize.
2.) Topic two is ‘Gut Feelings’ – first of several installments on talks on the book by gerd gigerenzer – Viking Press 2007 – that has interesting information on Sys1 calculations – Defining gut (intuition or hunch or in our terms Sys1 = Libet) feelings: Appears quickly in consciousness (we would say the results of the calculation gets posted to consciousness) – Whose underlying reasons we are not fully aware of – Is strong enough to act upon, rules of thumb / heuristics, conclusions include Even when more information is free – situations exist where more information is detrimental – more information, more time, more insider knowledge can result in poorer decision quality, interesting quote by Whitehead ‘civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them’,
3.) An article provided by Prof Mills – ‘The Dynamic OODA Loop: Amalgamating Boyd’s OODA Loop and the Cybernetic Approach to Command and Control’.
http://www.dodccrp.org/events/10th_ICCRTS/CD/papers/365.pdf
DOODA is a model for C2. Falls into our ‘Beyond the OODA nonsense’ think piece. The DOODA loop is formulated in terms of functions that must be accomplished for effective C2, and these functions are then studied in terms of (partially overlapping) processes. The DOODA loop preserves the prescriptive richness of the cybernetic approach in that it represents all the sources of delay in the C2 process envisioned by that approach, and thus escapes the limited focus on speed of decision making characteristic of discussions of C2 based on the OODA loop.
4.) News article on contextual memory –
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/05/health/05memory.html?ref=health
For the first time, scientists have recorded traces in the brain of that kind of contextual memory, the ever-shifting kaleidoscope of thoughts and emotions that surrounds every piece of newly learned information. The recordings, taken from the brains of people awaiting surgery for epilepsy, suggest that new memories of even abstract facts — an Italian verb, for example — are encoded in a brain-cell firing sequence that also contains information about what else was happening during and just before the memory was formed, whether a tropical daydream or frustration with the Mets.
5.) Light field photography could be the biggest innovation to hit photography in many years – Lytro web site has some great examples.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/22/technology/22camera.html?_r=1
http://www.lytro.com/picture_gallery
6.) Memrise learning method –
http://www.technologyreview.com/printer_friendly_article.aspx?id=37874
The Memrise learning method is based on three principles. The first, Cooke says, is one of the most important aspects of memory training: vivid encoding. In order to recall otherwise arbitrary words, the user’s brain benefits from connecting them to an image. The more associations to a word the user makes, the quicker and clearer the recall. Memrise provides some associations for users—the Chinese character for “man,” for example, transforms into a cartoon drawing of a man. But it also encourages users to submit their own verbal mnemonics —- second principle of Memrise’s approach is to remind users systematically. Using an algorithm developed by neuroscientist and cofounder Greg Detre, the app is designed so “plants,” or words, wilt when not tended to. The user interface tells users which plants are wilting, a problem they can remedy by “watering,” or repeated testing. Reminders pop up when a user is most likely to forget new words, rather than at random intervals.—- final Memrise principle is adaptive testing, which means that questions vary in difficulty according to the user’s performance. “Other language sites get this wrong,” says Cooke. “It’s really important that you test these memories at the right time and in the right way.”
7.) The last topic is associated with the article by Bob Patterson – Part of the solution to designing interfaces for decision making is to consider the dual-process theory of human decision making and reasoning (e.g., Evans, 1984, 2003, 2008; Hammond, 2007; Hogarth, 2001, 2002; Kahneman & Frederick, 2002; Sloman, 1996, 2002; Stanovich & West, 2000, 2002).
http://edm.sagepub.com/content/3/4/331.abstract

This theory posits that there exist two sets of processes or systems involved in human decision making: analytical decision making (also called deliberative) versus intuitive decision making (also called pattern-recognition based), as will be discussed later. Importantly, we argue in the present paper that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for immersive environments because the intuitive process is driven by high-level perception (e.g., meaningful interpretation of sensory input via analogical reasoning – ** reasoning by analogy ** ; Hofstadter, 2001) and thus has the potential to be ideally engaged within an immersive environment. Moreover, we also argue that intuitive decision making is particularly well suited for generating robust decisions because the intuitive process possesses characteristics that are analogous to robustness. Thus, we argue that immersive decision environments should be designed with the idea of training intuitive decision making.